Hardware Stores and Undertakers: The Scott Brothers

Riley Wiltshire Scott was a lawyer, a judge and an entrepreneur.  With a tent as a store front, he established a thriving business at Red River Station, TX.  He supplied the cowboys traveling the long, hot, dusty Chisholm Trail with gear and supplies.  In 1873, he moved his business to Saint Jo, where he erected a building and continued to prosper.  R W Scott had four children. One daughter and three sons.  His daughter, Ida Evangeline married well-known Saint Jo business man, John Davidson Bellah.  His son Austin, followed in his father’s footsteps and served as a Montague County judge for several years.  But it was his other two sons, Wiltshire Leander and Walter Eldridge that together established a business that continued in the family for almost a century.

W L Scott. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trails Museum

R W Scott sold his business to his son-in-law in 1875 and moved to Denison, Texas were he remained until his death in 1890.  His sons Wiltshire and Walter quickly filled the void left by his father and established the Scott Brothers Hardware Store in Saint Jo.

Walter E Scott. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trailstext goes here W L Scott. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trails Museum

The original building was built on the square in Saint Jo where the bank is currently located.  A fire destroyed the building in November of 1911.  They rebuilt a two-story structure across the street and were opened for business again by September of 1912.
Wiltshire and his wife, Victoria Smith Scott,never had children.  Walter and his wife, Eula Hoover Scott, had seven children.  Two of their sons, W L and W E, continued the legacy begun by their grandfather, so many years before.

W L Scott. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trails Museum

W E Scott. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trails

After attending Austin College and working for Humble Oil, W E returned to Saint Jo in 1926 to join the family business.    His brother, W L returned in 1927.  W L had also attend Austin College and Mortuary school.  Both took an active role in the hardware business.  After the death of Wiltshire in 1936 and Walter in 1944, they took full control of Scott Brothers.

Scott Brothers Hardware Store in Saint Jo, Texas built in 1912. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trails Museum

In 1941, they expanded their business by purchasing J H Cone’s hardware and funeral home business in Nocona, Texas.  W L moved his family to Nocona in order to run that sector of their enterprise.  In 1944, they purchased the A A Croxton estate and remodeled the two-story home into a funeral parlor, which is still in use today.  In the late 1940s they opened a funeral parlor in Saint Jo as well.
Scott Brothers Hardware store in Nocona, Texas. Built in 1965. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trails Museum

In 1965, they built a modern brick building to house the hardware operation in Nocona.  In 1950 J Howard Morris joined the business in Nocona.  Morris took full control of the Nocona firm after W L’s death in 1985.  The name was changed to Scott Morris, and is still run by the Morris family today.

Scott Brothers Funeral Home in Nocona, Texas. Photo courtesy of Tales N Trails Museum

In 1979, W E Scott sold his funeral business in Saint Jo to J M “Mac” McCoy.  McCoy still runs the funeral home today.  W E continued to run his hardware business until 1983 when he sold it to Sue Yetter.  W E passed away in 1984.

The Scott family members were pillars of the community for close to one hundred years, their  graciousness in a family’s greatest time of need was appreciated by several generations in Montague County.  The tradition is continued by the kind folks the Scott Brothers handpicked to carry on their legacy.

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4 responses to “Hardware Stores and Undertakers: The Scott Brothers

  1. Is there 2nd building in st joe still standing?

  2. Another great article

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